Jan 3, 2022

How to Write the Statement of the Problem in Research

Every research paper describes the investigation of a problem: by adding knowledge to the existing literature, by revisiting known observations, or by finding concrete solutions. What contribution your publication makes to your field or the scientific community at large depends on whether your research is “basic” (i.e., mainly interested in providing further knowledge that researchers can later apply to specific problems) or “applied” (i.e., developing new techniques, processes, and products).

In any case, a research proposal or research paper must clearly identify and describe the “problem” that is being investigated, so that the reader understands where the research comes from, why the study is relevant, if the applied methods are appropriate, and if the presented results are valid and answer the stated questions. 

Table of Contents:

  1. What is a Research Problem?
  2. How to Write a Problem Statement in a Research Paper
  3. Statement of the Problem Example 
  4. Where Does the Problem Statement Go in Your Paper?
  5. Consider Using Professional Editing Services

What is a Research Problem?

Your research problem is the gap in existing knowledge you want to address, an issue with a certain process (e.g., voter registration) or practices (e.g., patient treatment) that is known and well documented and needs a solution, or some surprising phenomena or earlier findings that point to the need for further investigation. Your approach can be theoretical or practical, and the specific type of problem you choose to address depends on the type of research you want to do. 

In any case, you should not repeat what other people have already said, ask a question that is way too big to be answered within your study, or be so vague that your reader is not quite sure what your motivation is. To avoid such problems, you need to clearly define your research question, put it into context, and emphasize its significance for your field of research, the wider research community, or even the general public.

Where you put your statement of the problem depends on the type of paper you are writing.

How to Write a Problem Statement in a Research Paper

  1. Context: Putting your research problem in context means providing the reader with the background information they need to understand why you want to study or solve this particular problem and why it is relevant. If there have been earlier attempts at solving the problem or solutions that are available but seem imperfect and need improvement, include that information here. If you are doing applied research, this part of the problem statement (or “research statement”) should tell the reader where a certain problem arises and who is affected by it. In basic or theoretical research, you cite all the relevant earlier literature on the topic that form the basis for the current work and tell the reader where your study fits in and what gap in the existing knowledge you want to address.
  2. Relevance: The problem statement also needs to clearly state why the current research matters, or why the future work matters if you are writing a research proposal. Ask yourself (and tell your readers) what will happen if the problem continues and who will feel the consequences the most. If the solution you search for or propose in your study has wider relevance outside the context or the subjects you have studied, then this also needs to be included here. In basic research, the advancement of knowledge does not always have clear practical consequences—but you should clearly explain to the reader how the insights your study offers fit into the bigger picture, and what potential future research they could inspire.
  3. Aims and Objectives: Now that the reader knows what the context of your research is and why it matters, you need to briefly introduce the design and the methods you used or are planning to use. While describing these, you should also formulate your precise aims more clearly, and thereby bring every element in your paper together so that the reader can judge for themselves if they (a) understand the rationale behind your study and (b) are convinced by your approach. This last part could maybe be considered the actual “statement of the problem” of your study, but you need to prepare the reader by providing all the necessary details before you state it explicitly. If the background literature you cite is too broad and the problem you introduced earlier seems a bit vague, then the reader will have trouble understanding how you came up with the specific experiments you suddenly describe here. You therefore need to make sure that your reader can follow the logical structure of your presentation and that no important details are left out.   

Statement of the Problem Example

This is an example statement for a practical research study on the challenges of online learning. Note that your statement might be much longer (especially the context section where you need to explain the background of the study) and that you will need to provide sources for all the claims you make and the earlier literature you cite. You will also not include the headers “context”, “relevance” and “aims and objectives” but simply present these parts as different paragraphs. But if your problem statement follows this structure, you should have no problem convincing the reader of the significance of your work.

Context: Since the beginning of the Covid pandemic, most educational institutions around the world have transitioned to a fully online study model, at least during peak times of infections and social distancing measures. This transition has not been easy and even two years into the pandemic, problems with online teaching and studying persist (reference needed). While the increasing gap between those with access to technology and equipment and those without access has been determined to be one of the main challenges (reference needed), others claim that online learning offers more opportunities for many students by breaking down barriers of location and distance (reference needed).  

Relevance: Since teachers and students cannot wait for circumstances to go back to normal, the measures that schools and universities have implemented during the last two years, their advantages and disadvantages, and the impact of those measures on students’ progress, satisfaction, and well-being need to be understood so that improvements can be made and demographics that have been left behind can receive the support they need as soon as possible.

Aims and Objectives: To identify what changes in the learning environment were considered the most challenging and how those changes relate to a variety of student outcome measures, we conducted surveys and interviews among teachers and students at ten institutions of higher education in four different major cities, two in the US (New York and Chicago), one in South Korea (Seoul), and one in the UK (London). Responses were analyzed with a focus on different student demographics and how they might have been affected differently by the current situation.

Where Does the Problem Statement Go in Your Paper? 

If you write a statement of the problem for a research proposal, then you could include it as a separate section at the very beginning of the main text (unless you are given a specific different structure or different headings, however, then you will have to adapt to that). If your problem statement is part of a research paper manuscript for publication in an academic journal, then it more or less constitutes your introduction section, with the context/background being the literature review that you need to provide here.

If you write the introduction section after the other parts of your paper, then make sure that the specific research question and approach you describe here is in line with the information provided in the research paper abstract, and that all questions you raise here are answered at the end of the discussion section—as always, consistency is key.

Consider Using Professional Editing Services

Go to receive instant text editing with Wordvice.AI, our automated grammar checker. Then hand over your manuscript or paper to Wordvice editors for paper editing, thesis editing, or other academic editing services.

If you need advice on how to write the other parts of your research paper, on how to make a research paper outline if you are struggling with putting everything you did together, or on how to come up with a good research question in case you are not even sure where to start, then head over to the Wordvice academic resources website where we have a lot more articles and videos for you.