Jan 9, 2022

What is the Background of the Study in a Research Paper?

No matter how surprising and important the findings of your study are, if you do not provide the reader with the necessary background information, they will not be able to understand your reasons for studying the specific problem you chose and why you think your study is relevant. And more importantly, an editor who does not share your enthusiasm for your work because you did not fill them in on all the important details will very probably not even consider your manuscript worthy of their and the reviewers’ time and immediately send it back to you.

To avoid such desk rejections, you need to make sure you pique the reader’s interest and help them understand the contribution of your work to the specific field you study, the more general research community, or the public.    

Table of Contents:

  1. What is “Background Information” in a Research Paper?
  2. What Should the Background of a Research Paper Include?
  3. Where Does the Background Section Go in Your Paper?
faded red brick wall, background
Your study’s background lets researchers and other readers know the fundamentals on which your study was based.

What is “Background Information” in a Research Paper? 

The background section of a research paper explains to the reader where your research journey started, why you got interested in the topic, and how you developed the research question that you will later specify. That means that you first establish the context of the research you did with a general overview of the field or topic and then present the key issues that drove your decision to study the specific problem you chose. Once the reader understands where you are coming from and why there was indeed a need for the research you are going to present in the following—because there was a gap in the current research, or because there is an obvious problem with a currently used process or technology—you can proceed with the formulation of your research question and summarize how you are going to address it in the rest of your manuscript.

What Should the Background of a Research Paper Include?

You first need to provide a general overview: Depending on whether you do “basic” (with the aim of providing further knowledge) or “applied” research (to establish new techniques, processes, or products), this is either a literature review that summarizes all relevant earlier studies in the field or a description of the process (e.g., vote counting) or practice (e.g., diagnosis of a specific disease) that you think is problematic or lacking and needs a solution. If you study the function of a Drosophila gene, for example, you can explain to the reader why and for whom the study of fly genetics is relevant, what is already known and established, and where you see gaps in the existing literature. If you investigated how the way universities have transitioned into online teaching since the beginning of the Covid-19 pandemic has affected students’ learning progress, then you need to present a summary of what changes have happened around the world, what the effects of those changes have been so far, and where you see problems that need to be addressed. Note that you need to provide sources for every statement and every claim you make here, to establish a solid foundation of knowledge for your own study. 

When the reader understands the main issue(s), you need to fill them in more specifically on the current state of the field (in basic research) or the process/practice/product use you describe (in practical/applied research). Cite all relevant studies that have already reported on the Drosophila gene you are interested in, have failed to reveal certain functions of it, or have suggested that it might be involved in more processes than we know so far. Or list the reports from the education ministries of the countries you are interested in and highlight the data that shows the need for research into the effects of the Corona-19 pandemic on teaching and learning. Are there controversies regarding your topic of interest that need to be mentioned and/or addressed? Have any earlier claims or assumptions been made, by other researchers, institutions, or politicians, that you think need to be clarified? While putting together these details, you also need to mention methodologies: What methods/techniques have been used so far to study what you studied and why are you going to either use the same or a different approach? 

When you have established the background of the study of your research paper in such a logical way, then the reader should have had no problem following you from the more general information you introduced first to the specific details you added later. You can now easily lead over to the relevance of your research, explain how your work fits into the bigger picture, and specify the aims and objectives of your study. This latter part is usually considered the “statement of the problem” of your study. Without a solid research paper background, this statement will come out of nowhere for the reader and very probably raise more questions than you were planning to answer.   

Where Does the Background Section Go in Your Paper?

Unless you write a research proposal or some kind of report that has a specific “Background” chapter, the background of your study is the first part of your introduction section. This is where you put your work in context and provide all the relevant information the reader needs to follow your rationale. Make sure your background has a logical structure and naturally leads into the statement of the problem at the very end of the introduction so that you bring everything together for the reader to judge the relevance of your work and the validity of your approach before they dig deeper into the details of your study in the methods section.

Consider Receicing Professional Editing Services. 

Now that you know how to write a background section for a research paper, you might be interested in our automated text editor at wordvice.ai. And be sure to receive professional academic editing and proofreading before submitting your manuscript to journals. On the Wordvice academic resources website, you can also find many more articles and other resources that can help you with writing the other parts of your research paper, with making a research paper outline before you put everything together, or with writing an effective cover letter once you are ready to submit.